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Decibels

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Decibels

I found the following, understandable definition:

 

"Named after Alexander Graham Bell. We perceive differences in volume level in a logarithmic manner. Our ears become less sensitive to sound as its intensity increases. Decibels are a logarithmic scale of relative loudness. A difference of about 1 dB is the minimum perceptible change in volume, 3 dB is a moderate change in volume, and about 10 dB is an apparent doubling of volume. 0 dB is the threshold of hearing and 130 dB is the threshold of pain."

 

Decibels

Degree

Comparable Loudness or Feeling

140

Deafening

Jet Aircraft, Artillery fire

130

Deafening

Threshold of Pain, Causes Immediate Ear Damage

120

Extremely Loud

Thunder or Diesel Engine Room

110

Extremely Loud

Close to a train

100

Very Loud

Wood Saw, Home Lawn Mower, car horn@16

 Over 90 decibels - Hearing can be damaged if protective equipment is not worn

Decibels

Degree

Comparable Loudness or Feeling

90

Very Loud

Symphony, Truck without Muffler

80

Loud

Car Noise at high speed, Police whistle, motorboat on plane

70

Loud

Normal Street Noise, Average Radio

60

Moderate

Normal Conversation

50

Moderate

Normal Office Noise

40

Faint

Residential Area without vehicle traffic

30

Faint

Quiet Conversation

20

Very Faint

Whisper, Ticking of a Watch

10

Totally Quiet

Soundproof Room, Threshold of Hearing

  

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Last modified: April 17, 2010